Tag Archives: ssh

Installing the VNC server on Ubuntu using Ansible

In this post,we’ll learn that how we can install the VNC server on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS using Ansible. If you don’t know about Ansible, please check this link.

If you want manual step by step procedure to install the VNC server on Ubuntu, please refer this post.

First, download this Repository from the GitHub:

git clone https://github.com/arbabnazar/ansible-roles.git

Note: If git is not installed then you can simply download the zip file.

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Secure RDP connection through Vyatta using PuTTY

vyatta-rdpConnecting to SSH Server as gateway instead of directly RDP to a PC is safer way and add another layer of encryption.With this method,we can connect to any client that is behind the firewall provided that we have open the port 22 (or any other SSH port) to the SSH Server.

In First step, we’ll configure the vyatta, so that it will forward the ssh request to the internal Linux server that it will receive on it’s port 222.

(From the Configuration Mode, issue these commands)

set nat destination rule 110 description "SSH to internal Host"
set nat destination rule 110 inbound-interface eth0
set nat destination rule 110 protocol tcp
set nat destination rule 110 translation address 192.168.80.102
set nat destination rule 110 translation port 22
set nat destination rule 110 destination port 222
set nat destination rule 110 destination address X.X.X.X
commit

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Vyatta – Basic Configuration after installation

Vyatta is a routing/firewall/VPN platform based on a Debian GNU/Linux that runs on x86 or amd64 hardware and many virtual machine hypervisors. It is widely used in cloud infrastructure. It is appreciated by its robustness, reliability and the services it provides. Vyatta is more like IOS, JunOS and other enterprise platforms.

Scenario:

We’ll use the following scenario, to understand the basic configuration of vyatta.

vyatta

Booting the Vyatta:

After starting the Vyatta machine. It should go through the usual Linux boot process. Log in with the username vyatta and the password vyatta (or any other password that you have configured during the installation).

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How to convert PPK file to ssh remote server in ubuntu

To convert the ppk file into openssh standard, we need to install the puttygen tool:

sudo apt-get install putty

Here is the ppk key that we want to convert:

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File Synchronization Between Two Ubuntu Servers using Unison

Unison is a file-synchronization tool for Unix and Windows. It allows two replicas of a collection of files and directories to be stored on different hosts (or different disks on the same host), modified separately, and then brought up to date by propagating the changes in each replica to the other.

This tutorial shows how to set up file synchronization between two Ubuntu 12.04 servers with Unison that are on the same network but you can use the same approach on the servers that are not placed on the same network.

Before installing the unison,generate the ssh key pair on PrimarySrv and copy the public key to the SecondarySrv:

ssh-keygen
scp ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub arbab@192.168.1.203:

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Changing the MOTD in Ubuntu Server

Ubuntu server display a message everytime,when users log in at the terminal, this message is known as MOTD (the message of the day). Ubuntu Server generates this message automatically from a collection of scripts and motd contains the user’s last login time, the system version and information about available software updates.

Sometime, we don’t want to show all these informaitons to the login user and want to show customize message. To do this, we have to follow these steps.

First,we need to edit /etc/motd.tail file:

sudo nano /etc/motd.tail

Here is mine custom MOTD that I want to show to the users after login:

 ######################################
 # If you are not authorized to access#
 # or use this system, disconnect now #
 ######################################

Move to this directory:

cd /etc/update-motd.d

In order to disable all the unwanted information, we need to disable the execution of these scripts:

sudo chmod -x 00-header
sudo chmod -x 50-landscape-sysinfo
sudo chmod -x 10-help-text
sudo chmod -x 90-updates-available

Now, when we login to our Ubuntu Server, it will show us the MOTD that we just configured above:

Enjoy 🙂

Extra Info:

If you want that your server didn’t show MOTD at all after login, then just do this:

sudo dpkg-reconfigure landscape-common

Select “Do not display sysinfo on login”

Hope this will help you!

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